Readings

‘Everything I Do Is In The Same House, Just On Different Floors’: An Interview with Kyo Maclear

The author of Birds Art Life on spark books, the art of stillness in children’s literature, and collaborating with illustrators. 

My Family’s Favourite Forgery

On the art of imitation. 

One More Time Around: Remembering Chris Cornell

The singer walked a line between overt masculinity and brooding sensitivity—fearlessly exploring the dark, wailing with the voice of a man who could sound like he was trying to escape his own body.

‘I’ve Had These Feelings and This Fight for My Entire Life’: An Interview with Jen Agg

The restaurateur and author of I Hear She’s a Real Bitch on reclaiming the narrative, writing as catharsis and redacted nudes. 

‘We Must Have a Desire to Make Scale Models of the Universe’: An Interview with George Saunders

The author of Lincoln in the Bardo on stretching out in liminal spaces, the feeling in your chest when you’re working, and why writing fiction is like building a model railroad. 

A Difficult Birth

The larger deception is that birth is only about life. In reality, the only certain thing about life is death and every birth contains that prospect.

Infatuation is a Gateway Drug to Writing: An Interview with Chris Kraus and Sarah Gubbins

Talking to the novelist behind I Love Dick and the screenwriter behind its new TV adaptation about taking the love triangle to Marfa, working out creative pain, and Kevin Bacon. 

The Best Worst Team

Tragedy, spectacle, disgrace, massive wealth, grotesque inequality, and the tasteless whims of a hated New Yorker: does any baseball franchise more resemble America in 2017 than the Miami Marlins?

‘The Novel is a Hysterical House of Mirrors’: An Interview with Edan Lepucki

The author of Woman No. 17 on unreliable narrators, interiors both personal and domestic, and leaning in to where a book is trying to take you. 

The McSorley Poet

My father’s stories come from a career behind the bar of New York’s oldest pub, among the alcoholics and loners and deviants who became his people and helped him find his voice as a writer.