The singer walked a line between overt masculinity and brooding sensitivity—fearlessly exploring the dark, wailing with the voice of a man who could sound like he was trying to escape his own body.
The restaurateur and author of I Hear She’s a Real Bitch on reclaiming the narrative, writing as catharsis and redacted nudes.
The author of Lincoln in the Bardo on stretching out in liminal spaces, the feeling in your chest when you’re working, and why writing fiction is like building a model railroad.
The larger deception is that birth is only about life. In reality, the only certain thing about life is death and every birth contains that prospect.
Talking to the novelist behind I Love Dick and the screenwriter behind its new TV adaptation about taking the love triangle to Marfa, working out creative pain, and Kevin Bacon.
Tragedy, spectacle, disgrace, massive wealth, grotesque inequality, and the tasteless whims of a hated New Yorker: does any baseball franchise more resemble America in 2017 than the Miami Marlins?
The author of Woman No. 17 on unreliable narrators, interiors both personal and domestic, and leaning in to where a book is trying to take you.
A wide-ranging conversation with the journalist and author about David Foster Wallace, complicated relationships with writers you love, and how the Kardashians are like St. Elsewhere.
The new TV adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale, which centers on silenced women, is in a unique position to use aural components to convey the horror of dystopia.
The author of One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None Of This Will Matter on the challenges of writing, the politics of meanness, and the enduring legacy of the Indi-McSpicy.
East and West: the twin myths cast lasting shadows on the mind of the Apu Trilogy filmmaker.
After writing a novel that explored disordered eating, I needed to confirm the private truth I thought I’d discovered. Then I spoke to someone whose truth was far different from my own.
Both holy and wholly her own, Amy Grant was the soundtrack to my rebellion. When my church rejected her, what I heard was, “You can’t be a believer and a woman who wants more.”
The author of Startup on gender inequality, tech culture and the shifting world of journalism.
For the past five centuries being black has meant collectively experiencing grief in ways that the rest of society does not understand and cannot fully comprehend.
Speaking with the author of Behaving Badly about the spread of misinformation and what drone strikes and clever robots have to teach us about the future of ethics.
Talking with the author of 4 3 2 1 about unfair criticism, being haunted by what-ifs, and the stuffy conventions of modern American fiction.
Fifteen years after its release, Bend It Like Beckham is still an essential representation of South Asian teenagehood.
When I get homesick in New York, I scour Chinatown for ingredients to make my Korean grandmother’s radish, or mu, soup.
There’s nothing like trying to face your fears and reclaim your childhood to remind you that everything you believed was good and pure is a lie.

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