I wonder if my grandfather knew the helicopters he helped to perfect would one day be used to surveil and oppress black and brown bodies.
The director of Crystal Lake on short films, the power of props, and how we cope weirder as we get older.
The authors discuss Hill’s debut work, his love of dysfunction, and why you need to think about writing a novel the way you think about keeping a garden.
In the summer, I get skinny.
The author of Why We Came to the City on losing someone to cancer too young, and how New York reminds everyone they’re not special.
It’s hard to enjoy baseball if you don’t know what you’re looking for. And the box score teaches you how to do just that
Talking with the author about her new prison-set adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Hag-Seed.
Talking with the author of Here I Am about different notions of home, the downsides of television development, and whether or not he’ll ever write another book.
Talking with the author of Beatlebone about fictionalizing the life of John Lennon, the hard time Kate Bush gets in the book, and why rock novels are almost always disasters.
My desire to live without violence aligned nicely with my desire to be thin—at least on the outside.
There is freedom that comes with the chaos of Athens, and that freedom is written all over its walls.
Talking to the author of The Last Days of New Paris about applying a video game sensibility to fiction, redeeming and finding inspiration in the politics of the Surrealists, and when to add demons.
The author wrote what she knew, but also what she believed, what she feared, and what she was constantly trying to run away from.
Notes on two afternoons with the playwright who gave us Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Zoo Story.
Talking with the author of Substitute about an educational system at odds with learning, seduced by technology, and ripe for reform; the vanishing awe of teachers; and the madness that is lunchtime.
Pitch is a feminist-minded mainstream show about the slow, meandering game of baseball. There’s a great deal riding on it, and a great deal working against it.
When you have a hateful demagogue on your talk show, or taunt a man for his father dying on 9/11, or hire Ann Coulter to be a human punchline, you flatten out evil.
“The time of brows feels like it is expanding.”
Talking with the author of The Underground Railroad about knowing when the time is right to write a book, schools skipping over slavery, and why Sonic Youth made his acknowledgments page.
On Ellen Seligman’s editing alchemy.