Bisexuals, Wu-Tang, and Sarah Thomson Returns

By Hazlitt

Grantland published a gazillion word feature on the Wu-Tang Clan, featuring some choice quotes from Raekwon on their upcoming album: “It’s like getting the United Nations to all agree on one fucking thing. Italy ain’t having it. Japan is on some shit. You know what I mean?” We’re guessing U-God is Liechtenstein. 

In other Wu-Tang news, GZA (in apparent disagreement with the Insane Clown Posse)  gave a TEDxTeen talk on science and how awesome it is.

And, oh yeah, a dreadlocked Sarah Thomson announced her candidacy for Toronto mayoralty on a horse and buggy. She also posted an epic poem/white person rap about transit for her Tumblr and then took it down. Surprisingly, it’s still possible to come across as a little kooky when you’re running against Rob Ford. Also.

“Is it always illegal to kill a woman?” asks this very old ad

“We have young women in the same way being told: “Go out, be the best you can be. Get your education.” And yet we have not quite figured out how to keep them safe in those environments. All I can say is that there are powerful cultural forces that go back centuries and we’re now trying to undo them and we’re not going to be able to do that as quickly as I would like.” Anita Hill did a Q&A over at Jezebel today.

This is perhaps the only time that Bradley Cooper will be right, and Louis C.K. is so very wrong.

“There’s some indication that what makes a bisexual person may be less about what they’re strongly attracted to and more about what they’re not averse to.” Bisexuality – how does it work? Not content with their remarkably narrow views in the pastThe New York Times doubles down with The Scientific Quest to Prove Bisexuality Exists.

“What is focus and who has the right to say what focus is the legitimate focus” On the blurry, ascendant photography of Julia Margaret Cameron.

Your move, McDonalds.

“When the reality is … jarring, and enraging, or makes a middle-aged woman scream at a room full of strangers, why should one ever look away?” At The New Yorker—which, just the other day, published an unexpectedly controversial James Salter meditation on the subject—defends the media bombardment that has followed the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

The diary of a woman diagnosed at 61 with microvascular disease—“after Alzheimer’s, the second leading cause of dementia.”

“The cliché is that our leaders are corrupt. … But what I have shown is, no, the corruption has seeped down. Colonialism is corrupt, and so is the man that mends your gate.” Ahead of the release of Every Day Is for the ThiefThe New York Times profiles Teju Cole.

Surf Goldblum.

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